Employment Relations

Publications (by Dionne Pohler)

Publications (by Dionne Pohler)

Are Unions Good or Bad for Organizations? The Moderating Role of Management's Response

Employment Relations Unions Strategic HRM Voice

Unions can be good or bad. It depends on management's strategies and response toward its employees and the union.

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Are Unions Good or Bad for Organizations? The Moderating Role of Management's Response

Pohler, D., & Luchak, A. (2015) Are Unions Good or Bad for Organizations? The Moderating Role of Management's Response. British Journal of Industrial Relations, 53(3): 423-459. Read a shorter summary of this research here.

 

Union impact research has been hindered by an underdeveloped conceptualization of management response, contributing to inconclusive empirical findings. Integrating the collective voice/institutional response model with the appropriateness framework, we propose that an employee-focused business strategy is a critical moderating variable in the relationship between union density and organizational outcomes that mitigates the negative effects of unions and enhances the positive effects by sending a clear signal of management's intentions to co-operate. Using a panel dataset of Canadian organizations over six years, we provide empirical evidence to support our arguments.

Unions can be good or bad. It depends on management's strategies and response toward its employees and the union.

2018-01-15 18:34:50

Does Pay-For-Performance Strain the Employment Relationship? The Effect of Manager Bonus Eligibility on Non-Management Employee Turnover

Employment Relations Inequality Strategic HRM

Are performance incentives a good or a bad thing for employees and organizations? We find evidence that managerial eligibility for bonuses may strain the employment relationship and increase nonmanagemnet employee turnover, unless there are also HR practices that train and incentivize managers to treat employees well.

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Does Pay-For-Performance Strain the Employment Relationship? The Effect of Manager Bonus Eligibility on Non-Management Employee Turnover

We tested the organization-level effects of manager pay-for-performance practices on nonmanagement employee turnover within the context of agency theory and equity theory—two frameworks commonly applied to understand compensation policy and practice. We also propose an alternative theoretical perspective that predicts that managerial pay-for-performance policies may strain the employment relationship and increase nonmanagement employee turnover, unless there are HR practices that train and incentivize managers to treat employees well. We compare these alternative models to establish how well each framework explains the observed effects. Agency theory and equity theory receive limited empirical support in our lagged panel data set of organizations, whereas broader empirical support is established for the strain effect of manager pay-for-performance on the employment relationship. We discuss the implications of our findings for compensation theory, research, and practice.

Are performance incentives a good or a bad thing for employees and organizations? We find evidence that managerial eligibility for bonuses may strain the employment relationship and increase nonmanagemnet employee turnover, unless there are also HR practices that train and incentivize managers to treat employees well.

2017-10-31 17:17:13

Strategic HR System Differentiation between Jobs: The Effects on Firm Performance and Employee Outcomes

Inequality Employment Relations HR Practices Strategic HRM

Does treating employees differently based on the job they perform affect firm performance and employee attitudes? We found that while organizations may benefit from treating employees differently, employees who were recipients of lower HR investments perceived the organization to be less fair and were more likely to leave.

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Strategic HR System Differentiation between Jobs: The Effects on Firm Performance and Employee Outcomes

Schmidt, J., Pohler, D., & Willness, C. (accepted) Strategic HR System Differentiation between Jobs: The Effects on Firm Performance and Employee Outcomes. Human Resource Management.

The purpose of this research was to understand whether firms apply different human resource management systems to different occupations within the same organization (HR differentiation) and how the extent to which they do so may influence firm and employee outcomes. We conducted two studies pertaining to these questions. The first study was based on data collected from managers, and the results suggest that firms differentiate their HR investments based on the strategic value of occupations to the firm, which was further associated with the human capital of those occupations. Differentiation in human capital was also associated with firm performance. The second study was based on data obtained from nonmanagement employees. The findings indicated that employees who were recipients of less HR system investment had lower fairness perceptions, which were further associated with higher turnover intentions and lower organizational citizenship behavior. Although the evidence from these studies suggests that firms may realize benefits from strategic HR system differentiation, managers should carefully consider how to balance the effects of differentiation on firm performance and employee well-being before implementing such systems.

Does treating employees differently based on the job they perform affect firm performance and employee attitudes? We found that while organizations may benefit from treating employees differently, employees who were recipients of lower HR investments perceived the organization to be less fair and were more likely to leave.

2017-01-24 21:56:24

Balancing Efficiency, Equity and Voice: The Impact of Unions and High Involvement Work Practices on Work Outcomes

Employment Relations Unions Strategic HRM Voice

Are HR practices that encourage employee voice and involvement in decision-making, high involvement work practices, substitutes for unions? We propose that unions and high involvement work practices and systems are complements. Greater balance is achieved between efficiency, equity, and voice when good management practices are employed in the presence of unions.

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Balancing Efficiency, Equity and Voice: The Impact of Unions and High Involvement Work Practices on Work Outcomes

Pohler, D., & Luchak, A. (2014) Balancing Efficiency, Equity and Voice: The Impact of Unions and High Involvement Work Practices on Work Outcomes. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 67(4): 1063-1094. Read a shorter summary of this research here.

Theory and research surrounding employee voice in organizations have often treated high-involvement work practices (HIWPs) as substitutes for unions. Drawing on recent theoretical developments in the field of industrial relations, specifically the collective voice/institutional response model of union impact and research on HIWPs in organizations, the authors propose that these institutions are better seen as complements whereby greater balance is achieved between efficiency, equity, and voice when HIWPs are implemented in the presence of unions. Based on a national sample of Canadian organizations, they find employees covered by a union experience fewer intensification pressures under higher levels of diffusion of HIWPs such that they work less unpaid overtime, have fewer grievances, and take fewer paid sick days. Job satisfaction is maximized under the combination of unions and HIWPs.

Are HR practices that encourage employee voice and involvement in decision-making, high involvement work practices, substitutes for unions? We propose that unions and high involvement work practices and systems are complements. Greater balance is achieved between efficiency, equity, and voice when good management practices are employed in the presence of unions.

2017-01-24 20:32:48

The Merit of a Points-Based Merit System at the Edwards School of Business

Employment Relations Inequality Unions HR Practices Strategic HRM

A case study of the challenges in implementing a points-based merit system at a business school.

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The Merit of a Points-Based Merit System at the Edwards School of Business

A new faculty member is engaged in a decision-making process surrounding the development of a points-based system designed to allocate merit pay at a business school. The process is forcing her to evaluate how she is structuring the allocation of her work, which is directly affecting her motivation toward coaching a student case competition team. Edwards has historically used a judgment-based approach to the allocation of merit. The case outlines the rationale used in the design of the new points-based system, discusses the potential advantages and disadvantages, and highlights the perspectives of different stakeholders throughout the process, including the union, the faculty, and senior administration. The union is opposed to merit, so has outlined fairly stringent criteria for the awarding of merit in the new collective agreement. Faculty opinion is mixed surrounding merit more generally, and the implementation of a points-based system versus a judgment-based system in particular. Senior university administration is committed to the continuation of the merit system at the university as a tool to reward outstanding performance and to retain star faculty. The individual departments at Edwards are in the midst of finalizing the standards and procedures for allocation of merit-based pay. The protagonist is uncertain about how her department will proceed in the design and allocation of points, and how it will result in her re-allocating her work tasks.

A case study of the challenges in implementing a points-based merit system at a business school.

2017-01-24 20:24:50
News Items

News Items

A changing workplace means changes for the HR profession. Regulators, universities and HR associations need to keep up with the changes.

Transforming HR

A changing workplace means changes for the HR profession. Regulators, universities and HR associations need to keep up with the changes.

2018-08-10
www.hrreporter.com 2018-08-10 14:05:12
Governance Employment Relations HR Profession Strategic HRM Transforming HR 2018-08-10 14:05:12
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