Governance

Publications (by Dionne Pohler)

Publications (by Dionne Pohler)

Balancing Interests in the Search for Occupational Legitimacy: The HR Professionalization Project in Canada

Governance HR Profession Public Policy

Is HR a legitimate profession? Struggles HR practitioners face in gaining legitimacy in Canada and beyond.

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Balancing Interests in the Search for Occupational Legitimacy: The HR Professionalization Project in Canada

Pohler, D., & Willness, C. (2014) Balancing Interests in the Search for Occupational Legitimacy: The HR Professionalization Project in Canada. Human Resource Management, 53(3): 467-488.

Related: Pohler, D. (2014) Ontario: Please Come Back to the CCHRA. The Canadian HR Reporter, July.

Abstract: Despite broad debates surrounding how the human resource management occupation can increase its legitimacy, researchers have yet to examine the collective steps HR practitioners are taking in this regard and the extent to which they have been successful. We conduct a case study of the HR professionalization project in Canada via multisource qualitative and quantitative data, which we analyze using a unique integration of the trait and control models from the sociology of professions, as well as isomorphism from institutional theory. Viewed through the lens of these frameworks, we find that HR practitioners are attempting to emulate traits that define traditional notions of professions, and are aspiring to transcendent values associated with balancing the sometimes conflicting interests of employers and employees. Objective data from external stakeholders and institutions show that these collective strategies have been somewhat successful in garnering greater legitimacy thus far, particularly when comparisons are made with the HR professional project in the United States. We highlight numerous implications for future research and practice surrounding the legitimacy of the HR profession.

Is HR a legitimate profession? Struggles HR practitioners face in gaining legitimacy in Canada and beyond.

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2018-01-15 19:25:28

Multinationals' Compliance with Employment Law: An Empirical Assessment Using Administrative Data from Ontario, 2004-2015

Governance Employment Relations Law Public Policy Unions

Do multinational companies comply with the law in a developed country like Canada? Our key findings based on data from Ontario suggest that unions predict compliance across all foreign MNCs, and there are systematic country-of-origin effects on MNC compliance in non-unionized workplaces.

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Multinationals' Compliance with Employment Law: An Empirical Assessment Using Administrative Data from Ontario, 2004-2015

Pohler, D., & Riddell, C. (accepted) Multinationals' compliance with employment law: An empirical assessment using administrative data from Ontario, 2004-2015. Industrial and Labor Relations Review.

Our study contributes new evidence to the literature on MNC behaviors by exploring three related questions: (1) Do MNCs comply with local employment laws in a developed country? (2) To the extent that compliance varies across MNCs, what factors are important in shaping compliance? (3) Is there a “foreignness” effect for MNCs operating in developed countries, and does this effect vary according to country-of-origin and/or union status? To investigate these questions, we compiled unique firm-level administrative data on MNC compliance with regulatory and quasi-regulatory employment practices during mass layoffs in Ontario, Canada. Adopting a research design that uses the behavior of Canadian MNCs as the comparison group, our key findings suggest that unions are a very robust predictor of compliance across all foreign MNCs, and that there are systematic country-of-origin effects on MNC compliance in non-unionized workplaces.

Do multinational companies comply with the law in a developed country like Canada? Our key findings based on data from Ontario suggest that unions predict compliance across all foreign MNCs, and there are systematic country-of-origin effects on MNC compliance in non-unionized workplaces.

2018-01-15 17:27:43

Employee Inclusivity and Inequality in America: The Promises and Perils of Shared Capitalism

Inequality Governance Employment Relations HR Practices Public Policy Strategic HRM

Do shared capitalism practices that give employees an “ownership” stake in the companies for which they work—through profit sharing, gain sharing, share grants, or stock options—present a viable solution to address inclusivity and income and wealth inequality issues in America? Or is shared capitalism simply "old wine in new bottles"?

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Employee Inclusivity and Inequality in America: The Promises and Perils of Shared Capitalism

Pohler, D. (2015) Employee Inclusivity and Inequality in America. Perspectives on Work, 19: 18-21; 76--77.

There has been increasing interest in the promise of shared capitalism to improve firm performance, increase employee productivity, enhance employee well-being, increase employee voice and participation, and reduce wealth and income inequality. Recent research has found correlations between shared capitalism practices and many of these outcomes, particularly firm performance. However, shared-capitalism practices that increase employee financial ownership of the organizations for which they work do not usually fundamentally alter the governance structure and power dynamics inside the firm that really matter for ensuring employee inclusivity and reducing inequality at the firm level. To do so requires greater employee participation and influence over the decisions that determine the distribution of organizational benefits than is currently the norm in the United States.

Do shared capitalism practices that give employees an “ownership” stake in the companies for which they work—through profit sharing, gain sharing, share grants, or stock options—present a viable solution to address inclusivity and income and wealth inequality issues in America? Or is shared capitalism simply "old wine in new bottles"?

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2017-01-24 02:49:00

Co-operative Innovation Project

Governance Inequality Co-ops Public Policy Development

We need to take the co-operative business model more seriously as an economic and social development tool for rural and Indigenous communities in Western Canada.

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Co-operative Innovation Project

Fulton, M., Pohler., D., Massie, M., Overlander, D., & Wu, H. (2016) Co-operative Innovation Project. Centre for the Study of Co-operatives: University of Saskatchewan.

Pohler, D., & Fulton, M. (Nov 8, 2013) Why we should take the co-operative business model more seriously. Saskatoon StarPhoenix.

Fulton, M., & Pohler, D. (2014) Co-operative Development in Rural and Aboriginal Communities. Saskatchewan Business Magazine, April/May.

We visited communities from British Columbia to Manitoba, spoke with over two thousand people by phone, had over 350 community administrators answer a web-based survey about their community, and had a chance to learn from co-op developers on the ground about the intricacies and challenges of co-operative development in rural and Indigenous communities.

We need to take the co-operative business model more seriously as an economic and social development tool for rural and Indigenous communities in Western Canada.

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2017-01-24 02:46:21

Governance and Managerial Effort in Consumer-Owned Enterprises

Governance Inequality Co-ops Public Policy

What is different about the relationship between boards in CEOs in co-operatives than in investor-owned firms, and how should we think differently about governance in consumer-owned enterprises?

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Governance and Managerial Effort in Consumer-Owned Enterprises

Fulton, M., & Pohler, D. (2015) Governance and Managerial Effort in Consumer-Owned Enterprises. European Review of Agricultural Economics, 42(5): 713-737.

This article develops a political economy model of the board–manager relationship in consumer-owned enterprises (COEs), illustrating how the governance structure plays a key role in determining managerial power. The key conclusion of the article is that managerial remuneration and the resources devoted to governance are strategic choices for the COE and that their determination involves a trade-off. This trade-off depends on factors external to the COE, such as the COE's time horizon (as captured in the discount rate) and the manager's opportunity cost outside the COE (e.g. the remuneration paid in investor-owned firms). The trade-off also is influenced by the degree of complementarity between remuneration and governance resources, and by the sensitivity of managerial utility to financial remuneration and to governance.

What is different about the relationship between boards in CEOs in co-operatives than in investor-owned firms, and how should we think differently about governance in consumer-owned enterprises?

2017-01-05 22:33:19
Other Publications

Other Publications

The Role of Governance in Balancing Conflicting Institutional Logics in a Canadian Credit Union.

Governance Co-ops Public Policy

Using data collected through semi-structured interviews with top management and board members, this study provides insight into senior leaders’ perceptions of and responses to competing pressures in a credit union.

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The Role of Governance in Balancing Conflicting Institutional Logics in a Canadian Credit Union.

Credit unions are traditionally small, community-embedded and co-operatively-owned financial services organizations that developed to correct various market failures. Recent changes to regulatory policy in the financial services industry in Canada, coupled with advances in technology and urbanization of the population, have led to numerous mergers and consolidations among credit unions, particularly in Western Canada. This has the potential to undermine some of the historic benefits of CUs when compared to other financial services organizations, as it may require credit unions to begin to operate more like banks. The thesis provides a detailed examination of how senior leaders in one large Western Canadian credit union are handling these issues, and explores what the broader implications might be for policy and governance of credit unions in Canada.

Using data collected through semi-structured interviews with top management and board members, this study provides insight into senior leaders’ perceptions of and responses to competing pressures in a credit union.

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2017-10-17 02:17:14

Ontario Changing Workplaces Review

Governance Employment Relations Law Public Policy Unions

Find the commissioned research reports and the final government report for the Government of Ontario's recent review of its employment and labour law.

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Ontario Changing Workplaces Review

Government of Ontario: Ontario Changing Workplaces Review.

“A simultaneous review of both Acts is unprecedented in Ontario. The review process requires us to examine academic and inter-jurisdictional research, and solicit feedback from the general public and stakeholders. Since the launch of the review, a substantial amount of work has been completed. We undertook pre-consultation meetings with stakeholders and academics, released the review’s “Guide to Consultations” paper to commence public consultation, commissioned multiple academic research projects to aid in the review process, and met with interested stakeholders. We have held 12 public consultation sessions across the province. We have spoken at eight conferences and meetings to a large cross-section of employers, unions and worker advocates in order to inform them of the issues that are before us and to encourage their participation in the review process. In total, we heard over 200 presentations and received over 300 written submissions from employers, unions, employee advocacy groups, and other interested parties. We have completed our review of these submissions and an overview will be included in our public Interim Report that will outline many of the issues and options for change that we have been asked to consider.” (Changing Workplaces Review Advisors)

Find the commissioned research reports and the final government report for the Government of Ontario's recent review of its employment and labour law.

2017-01-26 03:17:24
Blogs

Blog posts (by Dionne Pohler)

No policy of the newly elected provincial government in Ontario has sparked more controversy than the proposed cancellation of the basic income pilot. We propose a way forward.

The basic income pilot in Ontario was unlikely to tell us anything we don't already know. Basic income supporters should change their focus from re-instating the pilot to developing and promoting options for a phased implementation. The most important thing to focus on in the short-term is that participants are treated ethically as the project winds down.

Controversy over board governance at the University of Saskatchewan could be mitigated by following these principles when selecting board members. Find this opinion editorial here.

Credit unions should be able to use the words "bank" and "banking" without fear of reprisal from Canada's national financial regulator. Find this blog post at Contemplating Co-ops.

What should Saskatchewan people expect from the government? Find this opinion editorial here.

News Items

News Items

Dionne talks to CPAC about the role of co-operatives in economic and social development.

G7 Summit Preview on the Economy

Dionne talks to CPAC about the role of co-operatives in economic and social development.

2018-08-10
www.cpac.ca 2018-08-10 14:03:12
Inequality Governance Development Co-ops Public Policy G7 Summit Preview on the Economy 2018-08-10 14:03:12
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Other Valuable information

Other Valuable Information

The five-week college teachers' strike in Ontario was one of the longest labour stoppages in the system's history. Panelists discuss the implications of the strike for different stakeholders.

An Ontario college strike out

The five-week college teachers' strike in Ontario was one of the longest labour stoppages in the system's history. Panelists discuss the implications of the strike for different stakeholders.

2018-04-11
tvo.org 2018-01-15 20:05:25
Governance Employment Relations Law Public Policy Unions An Ontario college strike out 2018-01-15 20:05:25
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