The Relationship Between Community Capitals and Quality of Life in Rural and Aboriginal Western Canadian Communities: Improving Policymaking Using a Place-Conscious Approach

Inequality Development

This study uses secondary survey data collected as part of the Co-operative Innovation Project to examine whether there is a relationship between community capitals and reported quality of life in rural western Canada as well as whether the relationships between quality of life and community capitals may differ across Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in the study region.

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The Relationship Between Community Capitals and Quality of Life in Rural and Aboriginal Western Canadian Communities: Improving Policymaking Using a Place-Conscious Approach

Policymakers around the world now recognize that quality of life is an important indicator of what actually matters to communities. Also referred to as well-being, satisfaction, or happiness, quality of life is a complex, multidimensional construct pertaining to one’s place of residence, physical environment, social characteristics, experiences, and access to services within one’s local environment. Given the close relationship between local conditions and quality of life, using community capitals, or latent measures of the current state of communities’ various resources and capacities, to measure quality of life may provide policymakers with a more useful quality of life measure. This study uses secondary survey data to examine whether there is a relationship between community capitals and reported quality of life in rural western Canada. To explore quality of life as a product of the communities in which community capital stocks are created and experienced, this thesis will also examine whether and how the relationships between quality of life and community capitals may differ across Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in the study region. The results may help policymakers understand how different types of communities conceptualize themselves, as well as how they may pursue place-conscious policies that build upon current community capitals to maintain or improve quality of life in these communities in the future.

This study uses secondary survey data collected as part of the Co-operative Innovation Project to examine whether there is a relationship between community capitals and reported quality of life in rural western Canada as well as whether the relationships between quality of life and community capitals may differ across Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in the study region.

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2017-10-17 02:18:46

The Role of Governance in Balancing Conflicting Institutional Logics in a Canadian Credit Union.

Governance Co-ops Public Policy

Using data collected through semi-structured interviews with top management and board members, this study provides insight into senior leaders’ perceptions of and responses to competing pressures in a credit union.

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The Role of Governance in Balancing Conflicting Institutional Logics in a Canadian Credit Union.

Credit unions are traditionally small, community-embedded and co-operatively-owned financial services organizations that developed to correct various market failures. Recent changes to regulatory policy in the financial services industry in Canada, coupled with advances in technology and urbanization of the population, have led to numerous mergers and consolidations among credit unions, particularly in Western Canada. This has the potential to undermine some of the historic benefits of CUs when compared to other financial services organizations, as it may require credit unions to begin to operate more like banks. The thesis provides a detailed examination of how senior leaders in one large Western Canadian credit union are handling these issues, and explores what the broader implications might be for policy and governance of credit unions in Canada.

Using data collected through semi-structured interviews with top management and board members, this study provides insight into senior leaders’ perceptions of and responses to competing pressures in a credit union.

/storage/files/Johnson.pdf
2017-10-17 02:17:14

Ontario Changing Workplaces Review

Governance Law Public Policy Unions

Find the commissioned research reports and the final government report for the Government of Ontario's recent review of its employment and labour law.

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Ontario Changing Workplaces Review

Government of Ontario: Ontario Changing Workplaces Review.

“A simultaneous review of both Acts is unprecedented in Ontario. The review process requires us to examine academic and inter-jurisdictional research, and solicit feedback from the general public and stakeholders. Since the launch of the review, a substantial amount of work has been completed. We undertook pre-consultation meetings with stakeholders and academics, released the review’s “Guide to Consultations” paper to commence public consultation, commissioned multiple academic research projects to aid in the review process, and met with interested stakeholders. We have held 12 public consultation sessions across the province. We have spoken at eight conferences and meetings to a large cross-section of employers, unions and worker advocates in order to inform them of the issues that are before us and to encourage their participation in the review process. In total, we heard over 200 presentations and received over 300 written submissions from employers, unions, employee advocacy groups, and other interested parties. We have completed our review of these submissions and an overview will be included in our public Interim Report that will outline many of the issues and options for change that we have been asked to consider.” (Changing Workplaces Review Advisors)

Find the commissioned research reports and the final government report for the Government of Ontario's recent review of its employment and labour law.

2017-01-26 03:17:24

Designing a Basic Income Guarantee for Canada

Inequality Income and Wealth Development

Designing a basic income guarantee in Canada: Details on Ontario's Pilot Project and costing plan for a basic income in Canada.

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Designing a Basic Income Guarantee for Canada

Basic Income Guarantee in Canada: Ontario's Pilot Project

Proposed Costing Plan: Boadway, R., Cuff, K., & Koebel, K. (2016) Designing a Basic Income Guarantee for Canada. Queen's Economic Department Working Paper No. 1371.

Abstract for Boadway et al. (2016): We propose a mechanism for implementing a two-stage harmonized Basic Income Guarantee with federal and provincial components. In Stage One, the federal government replaces its refundable and nonrefundable tax credits with an income-tested basic income delivered through the income tax system. The reform is revenue-neutral. In Stage Two, each province decides whether to implement a provincial basic income guarantee that is harmonized with the federal one but allows province-specific basic income levels. The provincial basic income replaces provincial refundable and nonrefundable tax credits as well as welfare and disability transfers, and is also revenue-neutral. All social services and contributory social insurance programs remain intact. An illustrative calculation using Statistical Canada’s SPSD/M model shows the financial feasibility of a national BIG of $20,000 per adult adjusted for family size with a benefit reduction rate of 30%.

Designing a basic income guarantee in Canada: Details on Ontario's Pilot Project and costing plan for a basic income in Canada.

2017-01-26 03:08:00