Inequality

Publications (by Dionne Pohler)

Publications (by Dionne Pohler)

Co-operative Innovation Project

Governance Inequality Co-ops Public Policy Development

We need to take the co-operative business model more seriously as an economic and social development tool for rural and Indigenous communities in Western Canada.

Read more Download here
Co-operative Innovation Project

Fulton, M., Pohler., D., Massie, M., Overlander, D., & Wu, H. (2016) Co-operative Innovation Project. Centre for the Study of Co-operatives: University of Saskatchewan.

Pohler, D., & Fulton, M. (Nov 8, 2013) Why we should take the co-operative business model more seriously. Saskatoon StarPhoenix.

Fulton, M., & Pohler, D. (2014) Co-operative Development in Rural and Aboriginal Communities. Saskatchewan Business Magazine, April/May.

We visited communities from British Columbia to Manitoba, spoke with over two thousand people by phone, had over 350 community administrators answer a web-based survey about their community, and had a chance to learn from co-op developers on the ground about the intricacies and challenges of co-operative development in rural and Indigenous communities.

We need to take the co-operative business model more seriously as an economic and social development tool for rural and Indigenous communities in Western Canada.

/storage/files/Fulton_Pohler_SKBusinessMagazine.pdf
2017-01-24 02:46:21
Other Publications

Other Publications

The Relationship Between Community Capitals and Quality of Life in Rural and Aboriginal Western Canadian Communities: Improving Policymaking Using a Place-Conscious Approach

Inequality Governance Development

This study uses secondary survey data collected as part of the Co-operative Innovation Project to examine whether there is a relationship between community capitals and reported quality of life in rural western Canada as well as whether the relationships between quality of life and community capitals may differ across Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in the study region.

Read more Download here
The Relationship Between Community Capitals and Quality of Life in Rural and Aboriginal Western Canadian Communities: Improving Policymaking Using a Place-Conscious Approach

Policymakers around the world now recognize that quality of life is an important indicator of what actually matters to communities. Also referred to as well-being, satisfaction, or happiness, quality of life is a complex, multidimensional construct pertaining to one’s place of residence, physical environment, social characteristics, experiences, and access to services within one’s local environment. Given the close relationship between local conditions and quality of life, using community capitals, or latent measures of the current state of communities’ various resources and capacities, to measure quality of life may provide policymakers with a more useful quality of life measure. This study uses secondary survey data to examine whether there is a relationship between community capitals and reported quality of life in rural western Canada. To explore quality of life as a product of the communities in which community capital stocks are created and experienced, this thesis will also examine whether and how the relationships between quality of life and community capitals may differ across Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in the study region. The results may help policymakers understand how different types of communities conceptualize themselves, as well as how they may pursue place-conscious policies that build upon current community capitals to maintain or improve quality of life in these communities in the future.

This study uses secondary survey data collected as part of the Co-operative Innovation Project to examine whether there is a relationship between community capitals and reported quality of life in rural western Canada as well as whether the relationships between quality of life and community capitals may differ across Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in the study region.

/storage/files/Gouchie.pdf
2017-10-17 02:18:46

Designing a Basic Income Guarantee for Canada

Inequality Governance Income and Wealth Development

Designing a basic income guarantee in Canada: Details on Ontario's Pilot Project and costing plan for a basic income in Canada.

Read more
Designing a Basic Income Guarantee for Canada

Basic Income Guarantee in Canada: Ontario's Pilot Project

Proposed Costing Plan: Boadway, R., Cuff, K., & Koebel, K. (2016) Designing a Basic Income Guarantee for Canada. Queen's Economic Department Working Paper No. 1371.

Abstract for Boadway et al. (2016): We propose a mechanism for implementing a two-stage harmonized Basic Income Guarantee with federal and provincial components. In Stage One, the federal government replaces its refundable and nonrefundable tax credits with an income-tested basic income delivered through the income tax system. The reform is revenue-neutral. In Stage Two, each province decides whether to implement a provincial basic income guarantee that is harmonized with the federal one but allows province-specific basic income levels. The provincial basic income replaces provincial refundable and nonrefundable tax credits as well as welfare and disability transfers, and is also revenue-neutral. All social services and contributory social insurance programs remain intact. An illustrative calculation using Statistical Canada’s SPSD/M model shows the financial feasibility of a national BIG of $20,000 per adult adjusted for family size with a benefit reduction rate of 30%.

Designing a basic income guarantee in Canada: Details on Ontario's Pilot Project and costing plan for a basic income in Canada.

2017-01-26 03:08:00
Blogs

Blog posts (by Dionne Pohler)

No policy of the newly elected provincial government in Ontario has sparked more controversy than the proposed cancellation of the basic income pilot. We propose a way forward.

The basic income pilot in Ontario was unlikely to tell us anything we don't already know. Basic income supporters should change their focus from re-instating the pilot to developing and promoting options for a phased implementation. The most important thing to focus on in the short-term is that participants are treated ethically as the project winds down.

Society needs to take the co-operative business model more seriously as an alternative to conventional investor-owned firms. Find this opinion article here.

Articles

Articles

In this op ed, Kevin Milligan argues that "nothing has contributed more than natural resources to buttressing the Canadian middle class against the rapidly changing global economy of the 21st century."

Resource jobs are sustaining Canada's middle class. Period.

In this op ed, Kevin Milligan argues that "nothing has contributed more than natural resources to buttressing the Canadian middle class against the rapidly changing global economy of the 21st century."

2018-04-17
www.theglobeandmail.com 2018-04-17 20:42:39
Inequality Governance Income and Wealth Development Resource jobs are sustaining Canada's middle class. Period. 2018-04-17 20:42:39
Show more

"This is the fundamental weakness of the minimum wage: you can force business to pay their employees more, but you can’t force them to hire them."

Why a guaranteed minimum income is a better option than raising the minimum wage

"This is the fundamental weakness of the minimum wage: you can force business to pay their employees more, but you can’t force them to hire them."

2018-02-16
nationalpost.com 2018-01-15 20:15:06
Inequality Governance Employment Relations Development Income and Wealth Law Why a guaranteed minimum income is a better option than raising the minimum wage 2018-01-15 20:15:06
Show more

"The election of Justin Trudeau's Liberal government was supposed to signal a new 'nation-to-nation relationship.' But until the country recognizes the right to self-determination and acknowledges the sovereignty of Indigenous nations, argues Alicia Elliott, the future will be the same as the past. Alicia Elliott is a Tuscarora writer from Six Nations, currently living in Brantford, Ontario."

A memo to Canada: Indigenous people are not your incompetent children

"The election of Justin Trudeau's Liberal government was supposed to signal a new 'nation-to-nation relationship.' But until the country recognizes the right to self-determination and acknowledges the sovereignty of Indigenous nations, argues Alicia Elliott, the future will be the same as the past. Alicia Elliott is a Tuscarora writer from Six Nations, currently living in Brantford, Ontario."

2018-02-16
www.theglobeandmail.com 2018-01-15 20:12:38
Inequality Governance Development Discrimination A memo to Canada: Indigenous people are not your incompetent children 2018-01-15 20:12:38
Show more

"For decades, income distribution was ignored by a policy consensus that favoured free markets. Research on income inequality is challenging that view."

A new narrative on income inequality and growth

"For decades, income distribution was ignored by a policy consensus that favoured free markets. Research on income inequality is challenging that view."

2018-02-16
policyoptions.irpp.org 2017-10-31 22:07:10
Inequality Governance Income and Wealth Development A new narrative on income inequality and growth 2017-10-31 22:07:10
Show more
News Items

News Items

Dionne talks to CPAC about the role of co-operatives in economic and social development.

G7 Summit Preview on the Economy

Dionne talks to CPAC about the role of co-operatives in economic and social development.

2018-08-10
www.cpac.ca 2018-08-10 14:03:12
Inequality Governance Development Co-ops Public Policy G7 Summit Preview on the Economy 2018-08-10 14:03:12
Show more
Other Valuable information

Other Valuable Information

On a per capita basis, the annual cost would range between $9,421 and $10,169 for the period 2018-2023.

Summary from the PBO:

The total annual estimated gross cost of the defined GBI would range between $76.0 billion and $79.5 billion for the period 2018-2023. The guaranteed income for disability would range between $3.2 billion and $3.5 billion.

PBO forecasts that more than 7.5 million people would benefit from the basic cost of GBI. Thus, on a per capita basis, the annual cost would range between $9,421 and $10,169 for the period 2018-2023.

The actual federal support for low-income Canadians and vulnerable groups defined by our benchmark model is about $32.9 billion. If this amount were deducted from the total estimated GBI cost of $76.0 billion in 2018-2019, the net cost of a federally implemented GBI would be $43.1 billion. However, the GBI could take the form of a combined federal-provincial basic income system managed by an intergovernmental fiscal arrangement. This would replace some provincial transfers for low-income individuals and families, including many non-refundable and refundable tax credits, thereby reducing its net cost.

Costing a national guaranteed basic income using the Ontario basic income model

Summary from the PBO:

The total annual estimated gross cost of the defined GBI would range between $76.0 billion and $79.5 billion for the period 2018-2023. The guaranteed income for disability would range between $3.2 billion and $3.5 billion.

PBO forecasts that more than 7.5 million people would benefit from the basic cost of GBI. Thus, on a per capita basis, the annual cost would range between $9,421 and $10,169 for the period 2018-2023.

The actual federal support for low-income Canadians and vulnerable groups defined by our benchmark model is about $32.9 billion. If this amount were deducted from the total estimated GBI cost of $76.0 billion in 2018-2019, the net cost of a federally implemented GBI would be $43.1 billion. However, the GBI could take the form of a combined federal-provincial basic income system managed by an intergovernmental fiscal arrangement. This would replace some provincial transfers for low-income individuals and families, including many non-refundable and refundable tax credits, thereby reducing its net cost.

On a per capita basis, the annual cost would range between $9,421 and $10,169 for the period 2018-2023.

2018-08-10
www.pbo-dpb.gc.ca 2018-04-18 18:54:06

Summary from the PBO:

The total annual estimated gross cost of the defined GBI would range between $76.0 billion and $79.5 billion for the period 2018-2023. The guaranteed income for disability would range between $3.2 billion and $3.5 billion.

PBO forecasts that more than 7.5 million people would benefit from the basic cost of GBI. Thus, on a per capita basis, the annual cost would range between $9,421 and $10,169 for the period 2018-2023.

The actual federal support for low-income Canadians and vulnerable groups defined by our benchmark model is about $32.9 billion. If this amount were deducted from the total estimated GBI cost of $76.0 billion in 2018-2019, the net cost of a federally implemented GBI would be $43.1 billion. However, the GBI could take the form of a combined federal-provincial basic income system managed by an intergovernmental fiscal arrangement. This would replace some provincial transfers for low-income individuals and families, including many non-refundable and refundable tax credits, thereby reducing its net cost.

Inequality Governance Income and Wealth Development Costing a national guaranteed basic income using the Ontario basic income model 2018-04-18 18:54:06
Show more