Inequality

Publications (by Dionne Pohler)

Publications (by Dionne Pohler)

Strategic HR System Differentiation between Jobs: The Effects on Firm Performance and Employee Outcomes

Inequality Employment Relations HR Practices Strategic HRM

Does treating employees differently based on the job they perform affect firm performance and employee attitudes? We found that while organizations may benefit from treating employees differently, employees who were recipients of lower HR investments perceived the organization to be less fair and were more likely to leave.

Read more
Strategic HR System Differentiation between Jobs: The Effects on Firm Performance and Employee Outcomes

Schmidt, J., Pohler, D., & Willness, C. (accepted) Strategic HR System Differentiation between Jobs: The Effects on Firm Performance and Employee Outcomes. Human Resource Management.

The purpose of this research was to understand whether firms apply different human resource management systems to different occupations within the same organization (HR differentiation) and how the extent to which they do so may influence firm and employee outcomes. We conducted two studies pertaining to these questions. The first study was based on data collected from managers, and the results suggest that firms differentiate their HR investments based on the strategic value of occupations to the firm, which was further associated with the human capital of those occupations. Differentiation in human capital was also associated with firm performance. The second study was based on data obtained from nonmanagement employees. The findings indicated that employees who were recipients of less HR system investment had lower fairness perceptions, which were further associated with higher turnover intentions and lower organizational citizenship behavior. Although the evidence from these studies suggests that firms may realize benefits from strategic HR system differentiation, managers should carefully consider how to balance the effects of differentiation on firm performance and employee well-being before implementing such systems.

Does treating employees differently based on the job they perform affect firm performance and employee attitudes? We found that while organizations may benefit from treating employees differently, employees who were recipients of lower HR investments perceived the organization to be less fair and were more likely to leave.

2017-01-24 21:56:24

The Merit of a Points-Based Merit System at the Edwards School of Business

Employment Relations Inequality Unions HR Practices Strategic HRM

A case study of the challenges in implementing a points-based merit system at a business school.

Read more
The Merit of a Points-Based Merit System at the Edwards School of Business

A new faculty member is engaged in a decision-making process surrounding the development of a points-based system designed to allocate merit pay at a business school. The process is forcing her to evaluate how she is structuring the allocation of her work, which is directly affecting her motivation toward coaching a student case competition team. Edwards has historically used a judgment-based approach to the allocation of merit. The case outlines the rationale used in the design of the new points-based system, discusses the potential advantages and disadvantages, and highlights the perspectives of different stakeholders throughout the process, including the union, the faculty, and senior administration. The union is opposed to merit, so has outlined fairly stringent criteria for the awarding of merit in the new collective agreement. Faculty opinion is mixed surrounding merit more generally, and the implementation of a points-based system versus a judgment-based system in particular. Senior university administration is committed to the continuation of the merit system at the university as a tool to reward outstanding performance and to retain star faculty. The individual departments at Edwards are in the midst of finalizing the standards and procedures for allocation of merit-based pay. The protagonist is uncertain about how her department will proceed in the design and allocation of points, and how it will result in her re-allocating her work tasks.

A case study of the challenges in implementing a points-based merit system at a business school.

2017-01-24 20:24:50

Employee Inclusivity and Inequality in America: The Promises and Perils of Shared Capitalism

Inequality Governance Employment Relations HR Practices Public Policy Strategic HRM

Do shared capitalism practices that give employees an “ownership” stake in the companies for which they work—through profit sharing, gain sharing, share grants, or stock options—present a viable solution to address inclusivity and income and wealth inequality issues in America? Or is shared capitalism simply "old wine in new bottles"?

Read more Download here
Employee Inclusivity and Inequality in America: The Promises and Perils of Shared Capitalism

Pohler, D. (2015) Employee Inclusivity and Inequality in America. Perspectives on Work, 19: 18-21; 76--77.

There has been increasing interest in the promise of shared capitalism to improve firm performance, increase employee productivity, enhance employee well-being, increase employee voice and participation, and reduce wealth and income inequality. Recent research has found correlations between shared capitalism practices and many of these outcomes, particularly firm performance. However, shared-capitalism practices that increase employee financial ownership of the organizations for which they work do not usually fundamentally alter the governance structure and power dynamics inside the firm that really matter for ensuring employee inclusivity and reducing inequality at the firm level. To do so requires greater employee participation and influence over the decisions that determine the distribution of organizational benefits than is currently the norm in the United States.

Do shared capitalism practices that give employees an “ownership” stake in the companies for which they work—through profit sharing, gain sharing, share grants, or stock options—present a viable solution to address inclusivity and income and wealth inequality issues in America? Or is shared capitalism simply "old wine in new bottles"?

/storage/files/Pohler_POW.pdf
2017-01-24 02:49:00
Articles

Articles

Organizations often find it challenging to increase diversity and inclusiveness. Does diversity training work or backfire?

Debate: Does diversity training work?

Organizations often find it challenging to increase diversity and inclusiveness. Does diversity training work or backfire?

2018-02-16
www.gendereconomy.org 2018-01-15 20:35:32
Inequality Employment Relations HR Practices Discrimination Debate: Does diversity training work? 2018-01-15 20:35:32
Show more
News Items

News Items

"The experiences of Alberta and Seattle, two jurisdictions that share Ontario's $15-an-hour goal, offer some lessons on how to adjust to a higher minimum wage: that is, if Ontario businesses can weather the short-term storm."

Alberta, Seattle offer lessons for Ontario on 'Fight for $15' minimum wage: Ontario's rate increased to $14 per hour from $11.60 — a 21% jump— on Jan. 1

"The experiences of Alberta and Seattle, two jurisdictions that share Ontario's $15-an-hour goal, offer some lessons on how to adjust to a higher minimum wage: that is, if Ontario businesses can weather the short-term storm."

2018-02-16
www.cbc.ca 2017-11-01 14:04:08
Inequality Governance Employment Relations Income and Wealth HR Practices Law Alberta, Seattle offer lessons for Ontario on 'Fight for $15' minimum wage: Ontario's rate increased to $14 per hour from $11.60 — a 21% jump— on Jan. 1 2017-11-01 14:04:08
Show more